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Weather Forecasts

Weekend Weather for Dallas-Forth Worth

DISCLAIMER: #FakeWeather

If you don’t like the forecast, just keep reading the next one until you find one you like.

Forecast #1

The weekend weather forecast for the greater Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is the worst ever reported in Dallas. The Dallas Morning News posted a photo of an orange “pitch black” night sky over downtown Dallas, where it said that visibility has been reduced to less than half light levels. The newspaper said that visibility is expected to be as bad as the worst recorded by NASA for September 19, 2012, when it recorded only a 1.2/4.9 inch over Dallas.

The Houston Chronicle published this image of a darkened sky over the city, with a lightening storm over the western part of the nation’s second-largest city. Houston’s mayor declared a “flash flood warning” in Dallas, but the storm has since moved east, leaving many residents still without safe shelter in some of the worst hit areas.
For many parts of the country, the storm is expected to produce severe thunderstorms and damaging hail.

The National Weather Service in Dallas reported heavy rain and damaging flash flooding in parts of the region from Houston to Texas City, and warned residents to “take precautions” should lightning strike.
The National Weather Service also issued a “flash flood warning” from Dallas to parts of Houston and Oklahoma City.
The Weather Channel reported that lightning strikes in Dallas and Oklahoma City caused a flash flood and damaging flash flooding as of Wednesday afternoon.

The Texas Governor’s Office reported that lightning strikes during the storm are forecast for the Dallas metro area. There is a strong chance of tornadoes, damaging wind gusts over 20 mph in parts of the Dallas area. Heavy rain and hail are possible across the Houston area. The Texas Emergency Management Agency is urging residents in Houston and Oklahoma City to leave their homes early, and to take “extraordinary measures” to protect their property if there is an increased risk of severe weather.

Forecast #2

The weekend weather forecast for the greater Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is “badish”, with gusts up to 50 mph expected.  However, the wind will cool this week before dropping a bit next week.  This should mean that there is little chance of rain this week before the storm is over by late Sunday evening.  By Tuesday, the storm should be receding and the skies will be clear again, giving us the opportunity to warm up again before the next week of stormy weather arrives.  If this trend goes on over the next week, the rain will be more of a wash and there will be no major impacts to the metro’s infrastructure.

Forecast #3

The weekend weather forecast for the greater Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is extremely hot.  The highs are well above normal.  The temperatures are likely to remain above freezing into tomorrow.  The low and thunderstorms are forecast to bring winds in excess of 100 mph.  Rain is predicted by early next week with a chance of scattered showers. The city’s temperature on Thursday was  37 degrees Celsius  and the average high was  44.7 degrees.  In addition to these high temperatures there are a lot of thunderstorms expected to occur on Saturday and Sunday.  It is anticipated that over 2 to 6 inches of rain will fall this weekend. It is anticipated that heavy snow is possible on Saturday, along with several scattered showers.  It is also possible the low in the metro area is likely to move in excess of 15 mm on Saturday.  Rain may continue into Monday with more rain possible.  If precipitation doesn’t arrive as planned, rain will occur on Saturday, Sunday, and perhaps possibly Monday.

Saturday’s Weather:

Winds:  -20 MPH (12-21 mph  at 12 pm )
Rising Sun  -10 C (6-8 C at 12 pm )
Sunshine:  -15 C (7.1-9 C at 12 pm )

The following days:

Saturday:  -Sunrise  12-12:45 pm
Sunday:  -Sunset 12-9:45 pm

It will be a cold, wet, wet week on the Dallas-Fort Worth area.  We are getting close to getting to where the average temperature on Friday was in the 35’s.  If you want to get out in the rain, you may want to dress warm for tomorrow’s rain and snow.  However, if you don’t want to go outside, I can’t imagine why you wouldn’t want to stay inside as well.

Forecast #4

The weekend weather forecast for the greater Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is “wet and humid,” according to weather forecasts released by the National Weather Service. Temperatures will be above 50 degrees, and wind chills are expected to reach 30 and 40 degrees.

“The heavy rains will result in mudslides and power outages due to power outages,” the National Weather Service said in an email. “These outages will be most impactful on schools with heavy rains and potential flooding during and after football games.” There will be significant grid disruption when heavy rain starts, which may make traffic lights and other roadway facilities obsolete due to power outages. “High-end hotels are not operating,” the National Weather Service said.

“Due to heavy flooding and mudslides, traffic and access will be limited at major roads and transportation hubs throughout the metro area on Sunday night, as schools are closed during football games,” the weather service also said.

The Weather Underground has detailed the most severe storms to hit the United States and Canada.

The strongest storm to hit Texas on Sunday was expected to be a hurricane, the largest in recorded history.

“A low pressure ridge is pushing into northeast Texas with potential to reach Mexico on Sunday evening,” the Weather Underground’s Hurricane Center said. “The trough may weaken overnight, but the storm will continue to move inland and become an upper-level trough over the region. There will be a significant increase in the risk of coastal flooding due to the storm’s impact on land.”

In addition to Tropical Storm Harvey, the National Weather Service issued a severe thunderstorm watch for the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. The watch is in effect until midnight Monday.

“There is an increased chance that the area will get a sustained wind of up to 65 mph during the next 30-40 minutes. Winds could reach up to 80 mph during this time,” the weather service warned. “There may also see isolated hail and thunderstorm activity.” The watch for the Dallas area is in place until midnight Monday. The National Weather Service has issued a severe thunderstorm watch for the Austin metro area and the surrounding communities of Austin, Houston, and Dallas. The thunderstorms could reach the coast as a tropical storm early Monday morning and continue into early Tuesday.

“This is the fourth time in just over three years that a severe thunderstorm has caused flooding and damage, including in August 2013. The latest was during the Texas Flood Warning that was issued in mid-August 2014,” the weather service said.

The National Weather Service warned people to take precautions if driving in flooded areas.

“Roads are flooded and/or damaged with debris. Roadways, bridges, and other structures could be washed out and swept away,” the weather service said. “Motorists who are in flooded areas should not drive or drive on flood plains, unless instructed by a local police officer.”

The National Weather Service issued a severe thunderstorm watch for the New York metropolitan area and surrounding areas.

Forecast #5

The weekend weather forecast for the greater Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is incredibly promising.  Rain is expected in the afternoon and evening. There is also a strong chance of rain early Saturday morning and early Sunday morning.  The chances of showers are higher than the normal overnight temperatures in Dallas.  The chance of thunderstorms is higher than normal as well.  The chances of tornado activity is much higher than usual.  All of these conditions will create an amazing amount of fun and challenge for all.  If you wish to take your own pictures, don’t forget to bring flashlights.  In Texas, most flashlights are illegal.  We encourage you to bring your own but keep in mind a fair amount of parking is available.  In the interest of full disclosure, this blog is owned and operated by a business that provides services to those on the fringes of the photography community. It is important to us that photography is accessible and that every member of the photography community has something to say.  To that end, as part of our mission to make Dallas the photography capital for the world, we strive to provide resources to photographers and others who wish to get involved in this amazing, vibrant community.  Our hope is that you will participate in the creative process that will bring you the pictures and information you enjoy.  We want to encourage participation, but also keep our community focused.  We appreciate that if you wish to participate in our programs, then you will need to provide proof of your photo membership card, which can be found in the photo section of our site.  Please make sure that your photo membership card is valid in your local jurisdiction, and that you provide us with your contact information so that we can contact you.  Please contact us at  info@dallasphoto.org if you or someone you know has any questions about our membership programs.

Posted by Photo Editor at 1:23 AM

I’ve posted this before but it really helps explain what happened.  This was the same day I wrote about this and how to take a picture in rain, but I wanted to add it again since I’m seeing lots of comments.  I wrote about how I had some issues taking a picture in the rain and how my camera had trouble shooting flash.  So what I did is I took some pictures of a car and the light turned off in the rear window.  I went outside and took a picture with the flash off but it didn’t work out for me.  I’m not sure if I was just having an issue taking a picture in the rain or if my shutter speed was too fast.  I took the photo and the shutter stopped working.  Then I started getting a little worried.  I was getting really tired and my legs were starting to hurt a little and I was starting to feel a little bit of a pain in my leg.  I went outside again and again, and again the flash didn’t work.  Then I went outside again and again and again, and again.

Categories
Weather Forecasts

Weekend Beach Weather Forecast

DISCLAIMER: Not a real weather forecast.

If you’re planning a trip to the beach this weekend, be sure to check out our three day weekend weather forecast. In addition to the rain and thunderstorms we predict this weekend, we are also predicting that a number of beaches and waterways are closed and some areas are closed for the duration of your trip. Check out the weather forecast for your location below.

We are also predicting an extremely high amount of sand and sandstorm debris. These debris are very large and can cause damage to vehicles and structures. If you have any concerns about your vehicle, check with all of the authorities for any necessary repairs or repairs on your car. You may want to consider bringing extra cash, food and water to keep things going until you are out of the storm or until you can get it fixed or replaced with a safe vehicle. If the damage is too severe to repair, there will be no way you can use the beach and there will be limited beach access.

If you are planning on using a vehicle to reach your destination, you may want to consider bringing a vehicle to get around the island. A number of islands and some of the smaller areas of the mainland have designated areas for people to park their vehicles. If you don’t know how to get to the designated area, please call a toll free number and ask them to let you know which designated area you’re interested in, but please understand that the designated areas can get busy and that it may be difficult to get to the designated area and park.

If you plan to use an emergency vehicle to reach any of the islands, please call the nearest county police station or emergency management center and let the operator know if they can assist you with finding your emergency vehicle. If the emergency vehicle is not available, you may have to call the local authorities or the U.S. Coast Guard to help.

For additional information about storm conditions, please visit the NOAA website.

If you have any questions about the storm, please visit the NOAA website at www.weather.gov.

The National Hurricane Center will update you with storm conditions.

Categories
Weather Forecasts

Ominous Tornados Forecast for Tomorrow

DISCLAIMER: This is not an actual forecast from the National Weather Service. This is intended for entertainment purposes only.

The National Weather Service forecast for tomorrow is for winds from the southeast at 35 to 40 miles per hour, with wind shear at 5 miles per hour. The severe weather warning has been extended, with heavy rain likely in the afternoon. Highs and lows will be on the morning of Tuesday, October 19.

In a similar vein, a statement issued Wednesday afternoon issued a more detailed and ominous forecast for the next few days, noting, “We are seeing many tornadoes as they grow to the size of small cars and tornadoes in the area can become large tornadoes. We believe that all tornadoes should be reported in the order in which you think they will appear, and if we are correct it will not be until later tonight. The best chance of survival for many is to get down to someplace and go home. The risk is to be found where there are no roads but a small creek and a couple of old barns with no exits but some wooden shelter. If you cannot find a safe place, seek out a few places to hide.”

By this point of the week, some of the most dangerous tornadoes have already struck Southern California, a region which has experienced a spate of tornadoes each year for the last two decades.

On Wednesday afternoon, the National Weather Service in Riverside warned that at least 10 tornadoes have already damaged homes, and more are likely to hit in the coming days, including a twister which touched down at Lake Tahoe on Wednesday afternoon, the Weather Service said. A wind gust of up to 75 mph was recorded on Wednesday afternoon.

“The tornado was just a couple of feet away from one of our buildings and hit with no warning,” said Mike Schubert, a construction worker and resident of a home on a cul-de-sac on South Main Street, which was destroyed in the storm. “I saw a big white tornado coming right at me as it came through. … I was really scared, so I ran up the hill. I couldn’t get out of my house.”

Schubert, who lives across the street from the home where the twister struck, said he was on his way to work when he was knocked over from below. His neighbors told him a tornado touched down, and he went outside, hoping to avoid a potential tornado, as well.

“I saw it coming, and I was like what the hell?” said Schubert. “I didn’t know what to do. I was in shock. … I saw a big black cloud, and as it moved over my house, I heard that my neighbor was gone. Then there was a huge explosion.”

Schubert said he ran to a neighbor’s house to try to save his home, but he was too late: The house, which he had just built, had been destroyed.

“I was really scared, so I ran out to get my truck,” he said. “The house shook like it was on fire, but it was nothing like that.”  A few hours later, he said, “I thought for sure that my house was going to fall down and I wasn’t going to make it.”

Schubert said the tornado hit his neighborhood at the same time as several other tornadoes, which the weather service said may have been triggered by weather-related conditions.

The most severe tornado in the area was a 1-mile-wide tornado that struck Riverside County’s town of Lake Tahoe in a span of about 30 minutes on Wednesday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.

“I’m shocked they couldn’t get to the scene sooner,” neighbor and Lake Tahoe resident Kevin Smith said. “There was a tornado just over our house. There’s not a lot of power in the area.”

Another neighbor, who only wanted to be identified as Tom, said, “I think everyone was scared out of their wits. We thought this would be a real tornado.”

He said the tornado was so strong it shook his family’s home, but, “We didn’t know what was going on. We weren’t ready. I just knew it had to be a tornado.”

A witness who saw the tornado described it as a “big, black cloud with no wind.” The tornado touched down about 50 yards from the home of Thomas Pyle, a construction worker and employee of the county, which was in flames, according to Schubert.

“He said it was a tornado,” said Schubert, pointing to a nearby home where a house that Pyle lives on collapsed.

The storm also injured three other people, who were treated at Riverside Medical Center, and one of them was flown by helicopter to the National Weather Service’s Sacramento headquarters for emergency management.

“The injuries were pretty bad,” Dr. Paul H. Miller, an emergency medical technician and a member of the National Weather Service’s weather division, said. “They were all pretty serious.”

He said he could not confirm any of the victims had died as a result of their injuries.

On Wednesday night, Riverside Fire Department Chief Steve Smith said the area where the tornado hit was “very heavily affected” and said that it would take up to 30 to 45 minutes for water to clear. Fire crews were working in the area to restore power to about 100 homes. “I’m very worried about the damage to the structures there,” Smith said. “If it had been a bigger storm, I don’t see that it would’ve been any different.”